VIDEO: MUSLIM CONVERSION? “I feel like islam is the Last religion on Earth, i feel like there’s no other religion" - Andrew Tate finally explains reason for converting to Islam during interview on Mohammed Hijab's podcast KossyDerrickBlog KossyDerrickEnt

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Saturday, October 29, 2022

VIDEO: MUSLIM CONVERSION? “I feel like islam is the Last religion on Earth, i feel like there’s no other religion" - Andrew Tate finally explains reason for converting to Islam during interview on Mohammed Hijab's podcast

Information reaching Kossyderrickent has it that Andrew Tate finally explains reason for converting to Islam during interview on Mohammed Hijab's podcast. (Read More Here).

Andrew Tate explains: 
"I'm new to #Islam. I'm careful about what I say. I'm not a scholar. I'm here to learn. I'm on a learning journey. “And this is one of the reasons I converted…Islamic community are the only ones who have a base line moral fiber that can’t be corrupted.

“I feel like islam is the Last religion on Earth, I feel like there’s no other religion.”

Andrew Tate was relatively unknown until 2022 but in the past few months his profile has exploded. However greater attention has led to greater scrutiny. In late August Tate was banned from the full gamut of social networks -- Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, Twiter and Twitter -- dealing a painful blow to his Hustler's University online business. 

But who is Andrew Tate, and what is Hustler's University? The short story is that 35-year-old Tate is a self-help personality who revels in misogyny. Purporting to extoll wisdom to men that helps them "escape the matrix," Tate has falsely claimed that women bear some responsibility for being sexually assaulted and that they have no "innate responsibility and honor." 

Before being banned, his videos racked up billions of views on TikTok and Instagram. His main business venture of late was Hustler's University, an online course for aspiring alpha males that taught lessons on crypto, stock investing and "freelancing."

"He's the whole package so far as the emerging new forms of anti-women, right-wing extremism that we're seeing," said Deakin University's Josh Roose, a political sociologist who studies extremism and masculinity. "He's mobilizing a sense not only of insecurity, but anger."

The short story is that 35-year-old Tate is a self-help personality who revels in misogyny. Purporting to extoll wisdom to men that helps them "escape the matrix," Tate has falsely claimed that women bear some responsibility for being sexually assaulted and that they have no "innate responsibility and honor." 

Before being banned, his videos racked up billions of views on TikTok and Instagram. His main business venture of late was Hustler's University, an online course for aspiring alpha males that taught lessons on crypto, stock investing and "freelancing."

"He's the whole package so far as the emerging new forms of anti-women, right-wing extremism that we're seeing," said Deakin University's Josh Roose, a political sociologist who studies extremism and masculinity. "He's mobilizing a sense not only of insecurity, but anger."

After social media platforms blocked him, a spokesperson for Tate told Bloomberg: "Banning Andrew Tate from these platforms might seem the answer, but it isn't that simple. Removing Tate's voice doesn't allow for a kinder hate-free society."  

That's not how TikTok sees it.

"Misogyny is a hateful ideology that is not tolerated on TikTok," a company spokesperson said. "We've been removing violative videos and accounts for weeks, and we welcome the news that other platforms are also taking action against this individual."   

At the time of his removal from Big Brother, in 2016, Mr Tate said the controversial video had been edited, calling it "a total lie trying to make me look bad".

Google, which owns YouTube, told the BBC: "We terminated channels associated with Andrew Tate for multiple violations of our Community Guidelines and Terms of Service, including our hate speech policy.

"If a channel is terminated, the uploader is unable to use, own or create any other YouTube channels."

Mr Tate's YouTube channels had more than a million followers between them. TikTok has also banned an account belonging to Mr Tate as part of an ongoing investigation to remove content that violates its policies.

A TikTok spokesperson told the BBC: "Misogyny is a hateful ideology that is not tolerated on TikTok.

"We've been removing violative videos and accounts for weeks, and we welcome the news that other platforms are also taking action against this individual."

On Instagram, Tate had 4.7 million followers at the time his account was removed. That number had grown rapidly from around one million followers in June.

Meta said it had removed the kickboxing star from its platforms for violating its policies on dangerous organisations and individuals, but did not provide further details.

Andrew Tate's videos - promoting misogyny and targeting women - have come to prominence this summer, with many teens commenting on just how much he's appearing on their social media feeds.

His content has raised concerns about the real-world effect it could have, especially on the younger users exposed to it during their school holidays when they have time on their hands.

The focus has been primarily on TikTok, where users say they've been readily served up his videos - sparking a new wave of videos commenting on and criticising Mr Tate's content.

YouTube has also found itself under pressure, since it's where he has racked up millions of views.

I revealed how social media sites promote anti-women hate for BBC Panorama. The investigations exposed how some platforms' algorithms were recommending more and more misogyny to a troll account.

Since then, several sites have made commitments to better protect female users. But, once again, questions are being raised about the role social media sites play in pushing anti-women content.

Presentational grey line
Mr Tate has drawn criticism online for his comments, particularly from UK advocacy group Hope Not Hate, which welcomed Meta's ban last week.

Joe Mulhall, director of research at the group, said Mr Tate "poses a genuine threat to young men, radicalising them towards extremism misogyny, racism and homophobia".

He added: "We've provided significant evidence to the major social media platforms, including Meta, about his activity and why he must be removed."

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