Late Brazilian legendary footballer, Pele’s F£et To Be Kept In The Museum As Agreed By Family KossyDerrickBlog KossyDerrickEnt

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Friday, December 30, 2022

Late Brazilian legendary footballer, Pele’s F£et To Be Kept In The Museum As Agreed By Family

Information reaching Kossyderrickent has it that Late Brazilian legendary footballer, Pele’s Feet To Be Kept In The Museum As Agreed By Family.

Underneath that they wrote a paragraph in tribute to the footballing icon, in which they said: 'There will never be another like him. We will never forget that man who put Brazil in the pantheon of football. 

'As long as there is football in this country, every player who wears the number 10 shirt pays homage to the genius who immortalized that number.'

Spanish publication Marca wrote Pele in large letters with a small caption writing: 'Never before have four letters been so big.'

Italian newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport said the Brazilian 'gave happiness and enchanted the world.'

Pele died at the age of 82 on Thursday after the three-time World Cup winner's battle with colon cancer.

His passing has dominated front and back pages across the globe, with newspapers paying tribute to one of the sport's greatest players of all time.

Then they wrote as the headline: 'Eternal goodbye. Sadness has no end.'

Portuguese newspaper O Jogo had a picture of Pele's famous overhead kick with the headline: 'Escaped to eternity.'

Super Deporte, a newspaper based in Valencia, Spain, mentioned that the Brazilian legend could have played for the LaLiga club in the city on their front page.

They wrote: 'Pele dies. A myth that won three World Cups and could have played in Valencia. King - immortal.'

Spanish paper AS Sport simply posted a photo of Pele's feet to honour his talent, while also calling him the 'king' of football. His death was confirmed by his manager, Joe Fraga. The Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in São Paulo said the cause was multiple organ failure, the result of the progression of colon cancer.

Pelé had been receiving treatment for cancer in recent years, and he entered the hospital several weeks ago for treatment of a variety of health issues, including a respiratory infection.

A national hero in his native Brazil, Pelé was beloved around the world — by the very poor, among whom he was raised; the very rich, in whose circles he traveled; and just about everyone who ever saw him play.

Celebrated for his peerless talent and originality on the field, Pelé (pronounced peh-LAY) also endeared himself to fans with his sunny personality and his belief in the power of soccer — football to most of the world — to connect people across dividing lines of race, class and nationality.

He won three World Cup tournaments with Brazil and 10 league titles with Santos, his club team, as well as the 1977 North American Soccer League championship with the New York Cosmos. Having come out of retirement at 34, he spent three seasons with the Cosmos on a crusade to popularize soccer in the United States.Before his final game, in October 1977 at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., Pelé took the microphone on a podium at the center of the field, his father and Muhammad Ali beside him, and exhorted a crowd of more than 75,000.

In his 21-year career, Pelé — born Edson Arantes do Nascimento — scored 1,283 goals in 1,367 professional matches, including 77 goals for the Brazilian national team.

Many of those goals became legendary, but Pelé’s influence on the sport went well beyond scoring. He helped create and promote what he later called “o jogo bonito” — the beautiful game — a style that valued clever ball control, inventive pinpoint passing and a voracious appetite for attacking. Pelé not only played it better than anyone; he also championed it around the world.

Among his athletic assets was a remarkable center of gravity; as he ran, swerved, sprinted or backpedaled, his midriff seemed never to move, while his hips and his upper body swiveled around it. Before his final game, in October 1977 at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., Pelé took the microphone on a podium at the center of the field, his father and Muhammad Ali beside him, and exhorted a crowd of more than 75,000.

He could accelerate, decelerate or pivot in a flash. Off-balance or not, he could lash the ball accurately with either foot. Relatively small, at 5 feet 8 inches, he could nevertheless leap exceptionally high, often seeming to hang in the air to put power behind a header.

Like other sports, soccer has evolved. Today, many of its stars can execute acrobatic shots or rapid-fire passing sequences. But in his day, Pelé’s playmaking and scoring skills were stunning.

Pelé sprang into the international limelight at the 1958 World Cup in Sweden, a slight 17-year-old who as a boy had played soccer barefoot on the streets of his impoverished village using rolled-up rags for a ball. A star for Brazil, he scored six goals in the tournament, including three in a semifinal against France and two in the final, a 5-2 victory over Sweden. It was Brazil’s first of a record five World Cup trophies.

Pelé also played on the Brazilian teams that won in 1962 and 1970. In the 1966 tournament, in England, he was brutally kicked in the early games and was finally sidelined by a Portuguese player’s tackle that would have earned an expulsion nowadays but drew nothing then.

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